Low Registration/ Poor Registration

Return to Sensory Processing Concepts

Low registration refers to a pattern of sensory processing that is characterized by high sensory thresholds and a passive self regulation strategy (Dunn, 1997); when people have a low registration pattern of sensory processing, they notice sensory stimuli much less than others. The Sensory Profile measures cover the life span, and use informant report to evaluate a person’s ability to register sensory input. People who have low registration patterns seem uninterested, self absorbed and sometimes dull in affect. They do not notice what is going on around them, and miss cues that might guide their behaviors. We hypothesize that most events in daily life do not contain a sufficient amount of intensity to meet these children’s thresholds; their passive strategies lead to them being somewhat oblivious to activities. Dunn and colleagues have conducted national studies of infants, children and adults with and without disabilities, and have found that persons without disabilities of all ages notice and register sensory input most of the time, and that people with disabilities such as autism and schizophrenia are significantly more likely to experience low registration. When a person has low registration patterns, interventions are directed at increasing the intensity of sensory input to improve the chances for noticing and responding to environmental demands.

References(s):
Dunn, W. (1997). The impact of sensory processing abilities on the daily lives of young children and their families: a conceptual model. Infants and Young Children, 9(4), 23-35.

Suggested Reading(s):
Dunn, W. (2001). The sensations of everyday life: theoretical, conceptual and pragmatic considerations. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 55, 608-620.

Return to Sensory Processing Concepts